CAPTURING SAVANNAH

Savannah’s historic district is a photographer’s paradise, there is an abundance of subjects from the colonial architecture along cobblestone streets to the historical monuments and oak-shaded squares. One couldn’t also miss the multitude of silvery Spanish Mosses hanging from ancient trees scattered all over the city creating a romantic atmosphere. I was in Savannah five months ago for an overnight stop on my way to Asheville, North Carolina and I stayed in a hotel right in the historic district to be in close proximity to photography opportunities. Unfortunately, I arrived late in the afternoon so I had to rush my way around before losing some much needed light. Had I done some advance research I would have probably stayed another night, although I now have a good excuse to plan for another trip. I walked around the historic district for about 3 hours and worked my way through neighborhood squares, alleys and even a cemetery. Every corner brought in a new surprise as well as more cursing to myself for such a short stay in such a gorgeous place. Gladly I was able to take a few good photos of beautiful Savannah, Georgia to add to my collection of destination photographs.

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IN MEMORIAM

Today we commemorate that fateful day in 2001 when America was attacked by terrorists and the whole world turned a corner and was never the same again. I was still in the Philippines when 9/11 happened but I followed every moment of that day on television watching in horror as both towers crashed to the ground. Twelve years later I found myself in New York City standing at the very spot where it all happened fighting my emotions while remembering the events of that day. The memorial is such a somber place and is deeply sacred not only to every American but also to every citizen of this world who lost a loved one, a friend and a countryman. I’ve been to New York multiple times and everytime I visit I always drop by the memorial to pay my respects. The photograph above was taken last year when I brought my parents, who were visiting from the Philippines, to New York for the first time. Next month I will be in New York City and just like my previous trips will revisit the memorial to pay my respects…although this time not just as an immigrant but as a proud citizen of this great and beautiful country.

FONTANA DEI QUATTRO FIUMI

The Fountain of the Four Rivers created by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1651 is the centerpiece of Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy. This was the second major landmark I visited in Rome after the Pantheon, which was right behind my hotel. This impressive work of art represents the four major rivers of the four continents where the pope had supreme religious authority. These rivers are the Danube representing Europe, Nile representing Africa, Ganges representing Asia and Rio de la Plata representing the Americas. I was overwhelmed with emotions being in Rome for the first time and seeing all these monuments that I’ve only seen on pictures and films. Rome is such a beautiful city and photographs do not give justice to its real beauty. I may have taken at least 200 photos during my first five hours in Rome and I feel like I have not captured enough. I look forward to my next trip to Rome in a few months and I hope to capture a few hundred more photos to share with you all.

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