WHALEBACK FALLS

The first thing our tour guide taught us was how to identify a poison ivy. Apparently, there was an abundance of them in the area we were visiting so imagine my horror when we trekked through a narrow trail surrounded by a dense and lush vegetation with every leaf and branch touching me. Suddenly everything around me looked like poison ivy as I went into a panic mode waiting for the itch and rashes to begin. Thankfully it was just a short trek so I had my sigh of relief when we stepped into the clearing by the waterfalls. Fortunately for us, it had been raining for days prior to our trip so all the rivers and falls in the area were in full force. True to our guide’s primer, the Whaleback Falls did not disappoint. It may not be as grand as the Looking Glass Falls but the layered rocks created multiple mini falls that were awesome subjects for photography. Again I used the long exposure technique to create the cotton effect on the water but not long enough to capture more details, which emphasized the movement and direction of the water over the rocks. This falls was named Whale Back due to the large rock in the middle of the pool that looked like a whale’s back. It was not visible the day I was there due to the high water levels. This was the last of the three waterfalls we visited during our hike around the Pisgah National Forest at the Appalachian Mountains near Asheville, North Carolina. Thankfully no poison ivy touched me that day so I made it back to the hotel itch free. Check below other photos I took of the waterfalls.

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NATURE’S ARTWORK

A trip to the Grand Canyon in Arizona is something one must experience once in a lifetime. This beautiful work of art by mother nature exposes about 2 billion years of geological history. Last week I revisited the west rim of the Grand Canyon and brought my parents with me to see it for the first time. My father, who is a National Geographic aficionado, had the grandest time of his life. Meanwhile, my mother who had a few good screams everytime my father walked to the edge of the canyon thought it was an experience of a lifetime.

The park is inside the Hualapai tribe reservation and thankfully they opened a section of the canyon for public viewing. At the site, a skywalk was built so people can walk on glass floors above the canyon for some gut wrenching experience. We opted not to try it as my mother was not excited on the idea of walking on glass floors. Also, I wouldnt’t be able to bring my camera or my camera phone on the skywalk. Instead, they will have to take your photos and you buy them for a premium. I am not a fan of altering natural beauty.  I always believe that the Grand Canyon is best experienced by standing at the edge of the canyon with both feet firmly on top of those billion-year-old rocks. By the way, I took this photo using my iPhone 7 Plus.

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