Paris is one of the most beautiful and romantic cities in the world and to capture in a photograph the very essence of this city is quite a challenge. I have an extensive collection of photographs from my last trip to the City of Lights but I’ve been struggling how to present them in a cohesive manner. I did notice a lot of street scene photos in my collection so I decided to group together a few of my favorites and present them all in black and white. The monochromatic effect creates a timeless and romantic feel to the photographs as if they were all taken in a different era. From the magazine kiosks and roadside cafes to the charming neighborhood shops and magnificent tree lined boulevards, it is definitely very difficult not to fall in love with this city.



The opulence of the Château de Versailles in Paris, France can never be captured in a photograph. One has to be there to experience the luxury and lavishness of the place and understand the kind of lifestyle the French royals once lived. I found myself exploring one of the many rooms of the palace when my vision got diverted into a heavily decorated ceiling with a crystal chandelier suspended right above me. At first thought, the whole vision reminded me of a mandala, which is a geometric and religious symbol of the universe in Indian religions. In the case of my photograph, I decided to name it a chandelier mandala…a symbol of a lifestyle that most of us will never get to experience.


The elegant and sophisticated city of Paris was my home for a week in the summer of 2015. It was my first trip to the French capital and I made sure to visit every major Parisian landmark during my stay.  On my first few hours in the city, I visited the Arc de Triomphe and the Eiffel Tower as both monuments were just a few blocks away from my hotel along Avenue Kléber. The Arc de Triomphe was quite majestic in the middle of this roundabout providing a gateway to the world famous Avenue des Champs-Élysées. This monument, which is a museum with access to the rooftop, was built in honor of those who fought during the French Revolution and Napoleonic wars. When I took this photo, I forgot to remove a filter on my lens thus looking a little pink-orange…and so did every other photo I took that day. 😬😜


The Hall of Mirrors in the Palace of Versailles was constructed in 1678 during the reign of King Louis XIV of France. It is the central gallery of the palace and features 17 mirror-clad arches reflecting the palace gardens from the 17 windows across the hall. When I took this photograph, I wished the entire hall was empty although the chances of achieving that in the most visited place in France was beyond impossible. I visited Versailles during the last few weeks of summer right about the end of tourist season and yet the place was packed with tourists from all corners of the globe. I guess I’ll just have to be content with capturing this famous hall with a good number of faces expressing fascination and awe over the opulence of the French nobility. The last royal residents of this palace was the family and court of King Louis XVI and his infamous wife…Marie Antoinette.


The Flame of Libety Memorial in Paris, France is a replica of the flame on the torch of the Statue of Liberty in New York City. It is common knowledge that the Statue of Liberty is a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States of America. On the other hand, this memorial is actually a gift from International Herald Tribune (an English language newspaper in Paris) as a token of thanks for the restoration work on the Statue of Liberty by two French businesses that did the artisanal work on the project.  The Flame has also become the unofficial memorial for Princess Diana who died on the tunnel right beneath this flame in 1997. I visited the memorial on my first day in Paris and my only wish for this photo was for that tree and lamp post blocking the Eiffel Tower to be gone. Glad also that there was nobody there to block the memorial as this usually gets filled up with people laying down flowers and cards for the late princess.


The Musée D’Orsay is a museum in Paris, France showcasing the largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist masterpieces in the world. The building used to be a train station and is one of the most visited museums in Paris due to its large collection of works by painters like Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin and Van Gogh. Inside the museum is a viewing deck where you can look down into the main gallery and that was where I took this photograph. I personally enjoyed viewing the works of Monet, Renoir and Van Gogh…perhaps because they’re the more famous ones…or maybe because I am just one art ignoramous. LOL!


img_4300-1The Palais Bourbon is located in the beautiful city of Paris along the banks of the River Seine and is home of the French National Assembly. The palace was originally built for the daughter of Louis XIV and was designed by Italian architect Lorenzo Giardini. After spending a few good hours at the Musée D’Orsay, I decided to walk to the Invalides for more touristy sightseeing and found myself in a square facing this impressive piece of architecture. Fortunately, the square was devoid of human activity so I was able to position myself right in the center from across the building and captured this photo without a single soul to block the view.



I visited Paris about 2 months ago and stayed there for a week enjoying their food, music, fashion, architecture and rich culture. I fell in love with the City of Lights and my last night was made most memorable by a dinner cruise along the River Seine. The photo above was taken at the Trocadero Fountains capturing lovers in each others arms swaying to beautiful French music while the twinkling lights of the Eiffel Tower danced along.

Last night I watched in shock listening to the news about the terrorist attacks in Paris. Gladly, the horror is finally over but am still in disbelief over the amount of lives lost.  I pray that justice will eventually be served so Parisians can heal and move on with their lives then they can dance once more together with the twinkling lights of the Eiffel Tower like that beautiful night I captured in the photo above.


La queue

In 1682, Versailles opened its doors to anyone wishing to visit the palace and view its extravagant splendour.  Lines of visitors were screened by guards who made sure that no one carried weapons. Visitors were also required to observe proper palace etiquette including wearing a hat and sword, which were available for rent. To this day, people continue to line up by the thousands to have a glimpse of this grand palace minus the need to rent a hat and sword. Instead, you pay an entry fee which comes with a free audio guide.  While standing in line, I noticed the shadows formed by the line of visitors queueing towards the entrance of the palace. I thought it was an interesting photo subject noting that times may have changed but the long line of masses eager to see Versailles remains the same.

Parisian Cafe 

Parisian Cafe

The street cafes in Paris provides a venue for Parisians to sit undisturbed for hours and carefreely watch the world go by.  This centuries old lifestyle continue to thrive in this elegant city as these cafes are considered as centers for conversations and networking and as neighborhood hubs for people to relax and unwind. Coming from Manila and now South Florida (both hot and humid places), the tourist in me didn’t pass up a chance to have my Parisian cafe moment as well.  I took this photo by the Place de l’École Militaire area while strolling towards the Eiffel Tower after visiting Napoleon’s tomb.

Pont de l’Archevêché

The Pont de l'Archevêché

The Pont de l’Archevêché is said to be the narrowest road bridge in Paris, France featuring thousands of padlocks placed by lovers from all over the world as a romantic gesture and as a symbol of their commitment after they throw the key into the River Seine.




A symbol of nobility and tradition to the noble elite…a symbol of opulence and oligarchy to the masses…It was a beautiful day at the Versailles, it may have been a bit chilly in the mid 50s but the sun shone brightly and the sky was almost cloudless and deep blue. The grandeur was impressively overwhelming.

Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile

The Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile is one of the most famous landmarks in Paris located right at the heart of the Place Charles du Gaulle at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. This was built to honor those who fought and died during the French Revolution and the wars fought by Napoleon.




French gothic architecture at its best.

Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette

imagePierre-Auguste Renoir’s Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette is one of the most visited artwork at the Musee D’Orsay. People always flock in front of it to take photos as well as bask in the beauty of this amazing work of art. I was lucky for a moment when people stepped away from the painting leaving me a few seconds to snap this photo.


The Eiffel Tower captured at different times of the day and different sky conditions. It was sunny the day I arrived then it’s been raining since then. Every now and then the rain would stop and the sky clears up providing a dramatic backdrop to this majestic Paris landmark.


The best part about being in a museum is seeing a diverse array of people around you. While some are seriously scrutinizing the arwork, others are just busy posing left and right for their next profile picture. Below are a few photos I took of people who caught my eyes because of how they look or because of what they were doing. Aside from art watching…I was also busy people watching.image






I arrived in Paris, France yesterday to a cool and beautiful sunny morning. After 10 hours of flying (thanks to Delta’s full flat beds I got to snooze for a good few hours), I was ready to hit the town with my camera. It is my first time in Paris and imagine the overwhelming joy I was bathed in when I finally saw the Arc de Triomphe and the Eiffel Tower. I am staying at this chic boutique hotel by Av. Kléber and was exploring the neighborhood when I stepped into this intersection called Place d’léna. The beautiful architecture immediately caught my eye as well as the statue of George Washington right in the middle of the intersection. Most travellers to Paris would probably post photos of the Eiffel Tower or the Arc de Triomphe, however, I decided to post this to show that there’s more to see in Paris than those famous landmarks. Unfortunately, it will be raining the next five days I will be here in Paris so we’ll see how my other photos will turn out.

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